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The Rare and Best Of Barossa













Our specialty is seafood where we take a pared down approach. Less is better. And over the last decade we have been working out how to best cook freshly gathered funghi. Then there are recipes which we have used successfully over many years. These are adaptations of recipes we have taken from books and we will give you our source. Mostly these will lead back to another book.

Our Recipes

All About Chinese Tea, Part 2
The Famous and Special Teas of China

Wednesday, 2nd March, 2011 - David Farmer

I was fortunate to spend time in China in the late 1970's and early 1980's which came about from one of the poorly thought out business ideas of my brother and I to import tea from China. What follows comes from notes I took during an extended stay in June, 1980. I believe this information will prove quite useful to those who love tea and its many types. more...

All About Chinese Tea, Part 1
Thursday, 16th July, 2009 - David Farmer

I was fortunate to spend time in China in the late 1970's and early 1980's which came about from one of the poorly thought out business ideas of my brother and I to import tea from China. What follows comes from notes I took during an extended stay in June, 1980. I believe this information will prove quite useful to those who love tea and its many types. more...

A Fish Sauce and Tony Bilson's Whiting Quenelles
Sunday, 28th June, 2009 - David Farmer

Elizabeth David

Catching and eating fish is the ultimate life's pleasure. I seldom use a sauce as the approach to fish is cook them when fresh and keep it simple. With that said for a number of years I have experimented with a recipe of the great Elizabeth David which was published in The Complete Imbiber, No. 6. (Vista Books, London, 1963). more...


- Rabbit Pie with Pine Mushrooms

Friday, 5th June, 2009



- Mark Lloyd of Coriole Talks About Olives and Oil

Friday, 28th March, 2008



- Tales about Oysters, Opening and Eating

Thursday, 6th December, 2007



- Yeast Leavened Pancakes

Thursday, 22nd February, 2007



- Peasant Mushroom Soup

Friday, May 26th, 2006



- Fish, Eggs and Steaming Bream

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2006



- Cheong Liew's Steamed Eggplant with Tomato Chilli Sauce

Tuesday, 28th February, 2006



- Time for Saucing

Friday, 24th February, 2006



- Slippery Jacks in August?

Wednesday, 17th August, 2005



- Lentilles du Puy

Friday, 5th August, 2005



- A Delightful Warm Vegetable Salad

Wednesday, 20th April 2005



- A Tasty Fish Soup

Friday, 28th January, 2005



- The French Pizza from Provence - Pissaladiere

Friday, 28th January, 2005



- Another Broad Bean Option

Wednesday, 3rd November, 2004



- A Good Recipe for Broad Beans

Saturday, 30th October, 2004



- The Collection and Smoking of Mussels

Sunday, 18th October, 2004



- Cooking East Coast Whiting

Thursday, 14th October, 2004



- A Great Yabby Recipe

Saturday, 17th October, 2004



- The Perfect Fish Batter

Friday, 8th October, 2004



- Flathead Sushi

Wednesday, 15th September, 2004



- A Classic Carp Recipe

Wednesday, 4th August, 2004


The French Pizza from Provence - Pissaladiere
Friday, 28th January, 2005 - David Farmer

This pissaladiere is a great favourite of mine and now I’m living in Tanunda with many wine industry friends popping by, it’s perfect to serve as a snack or as an entrée. For a long time the Richard Olney recipe (which can be found in his coffee table book on the food of Provence and in his other writings like ‘Simple French Food’) was my choice but recently the yeast leavened recipe of Elizabeth Davis and Julia Child and numerous others food writers is preferred. The classic spread is onions, olives and anchovies.

The Olney version for making the dough is:

For one 30 cm pissaladiere
Plain flour 250 gm
Large pinch of salt
One egg
60 ml of olive oil
60 ml of lukewarm water.
Mix in the usual way and let stand for an hour or so.

This dough makes a splendid crisp, biscuit style base.

Currently though we make yeast dough the following way:

For one 30 cm pissaladiere.
Plain flour 225 gm (Lauke is very good)
A sachet of yeast which is emptied into 50ml of warm water to get it started
A nice salt about 1.0 to 1.5 teaspoons and I use all manner of flavoured and special sea salts in an attempt to add more complexity but the basic is as good as any.
Warm water as needed, about 200 to 250 ml.
Two tablespoons of olive oil which are added later.

Mix all of this in the usual way, let sit for 5 minutes and then mix in the olive oil. I use a ‘magimix’ which makes all of this very simple.

At this stage the dough will be very sticky so use lots of flour to help in rolling it into a ball. Place on a floured plate, cover with a tea towel and let it sit in a warm area for one hour or so. Many books say that after the first rise you should deflate the dough. I do this but have not measured the differences in the end result if you do not.

When the dough has risen again roll it out and place on the pizza tray. Some recipes say you should not roll the dough but press it into place with your fingers. This is easy to do.

I like fairly sticky dough and tend to add more olive oil than the recipes say, up to three tablespoons, as when cooked the pastry is soft and spongy but the outer crust becomes crispier.

Prepare the filling the following way.

Slice six to eight onions and do more than you may need as they do not cost much. Cook over a very low heat for at least an hour with just enough olive oil. They must remain translucent and white; you are not making brown onions to go with a steak. Spread this thickly over the pizza base. Sprinkle chopped up black olives over the onions or as I do olives that have been halved and push them into the onion base. Then make a nice pattern of halved anchovy fillets over the olives and onions. The quality of anchovies varies a lot and it will pay to spend money in this area. I buy the brand Orvitz from Simon Johnson but there are other good brands.

The secret now is to let this sit for half to one hour as the dough will rise again and fuse with the filling. Sprinkle with olive oil then place in a hot oven for about thirty minutes, but keep your eye on the pastry. As the edges brown push to the limit without burning so the base has a chance to get nice and crunchy.

Recently I have started to make a tomato pizza which is not traditional to Provence. Peel the tomatoes, slice and spread over the onion, then continue as before. I also add lots of marjoram/oregano to this but place some of it under the tomatoes as when it is sprinkled over the top of the filling it just burns and not much flavour comes through.



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