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Tremendous Depth of Fruit with Length

























Our specialty is seafood where we take a pared down approach. Less is better. And over the last decade we have been working out how to best cook freshly gathered funghi. Then there are recipes which we have used successfully over many years. These are adaptations of recipes we have taken from books and we will give you our source. Mostly these will lead back to another book.

Our Recipes

The Use of Decanters to Create Theatre at a Xmas Lunch
Friday, 6th October, 2017 - David Farmer

You can find great food in humble restaurants and spotting these places before the crowd arrives is most satisfying. In general though the great restaurants of the world, though I only know France and Australia well, are not modest in appearance. It seems success at the highest level of cooking is associated with creating a similar level of ambience, even luxury, as after-all the clientele are wealthy. more...

All About Chinese Tea, Part 2
The Famous and Special Teas of China

Wednesday, 2nd March, 2011 - David Farmer

I was fortunate to spend time in China in the late 1970's and early 1980's which came about from one of the poorly thought out business ideas of my brother and I to import tea from China. What follows comes from notes I took during an extended stay in June, 1980. I believe this information will prove quite useful to those who love tea and its many types. more...

All About Chinese Tea, Part 1
Thursday, 16th July, 2009 - David Farmer

I was fortunate to spend time in China in the late 1970's and early 1980's which came about from one of the poorly thought out business ideas of my brother and I to import tea from China. What follows comes from notes I took during an extended stay in June, 1980. I believe this information will prove quite useful to those who love tea and its many types. more...

A Fish Sauce and Tony Bilson's Whiting Quenelles
Sunday, 28th June, 2009 - David Farmer

Elizabeth David

Catching and eating fish is the ultimate life's pleasure. I seldom use a sauce as the approach to fish is cook them when fresh and keep it simple. With that said for a number of years I have experimented with a recipe of the great Elizabeth David which was published in The Complete Imbiber, No. 6. (Vista Books, London, 1963). more...


- Rabbit Pie with Pine Mushrooms

Friday, 5th June, 2009



- Mark Lloyd of Coriole Talks About Olives and Oil

Friday, 28th March, 2008



- Tales about Oysters, Opening and Eating

Thursday, 6th December, 2007



- Yeast Leavened Pancakes

Thursday, 22nd February, 2007



- Peasant Mushroom Soup

Friday, May 26th, 2006



- Fish, Eggs and Steaming Bream

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2006



- Cheong Liew's Steamed Eggplant with Tomato Chilli Sauce

Tuesday, 28th February, 2006



- Time for Saucing

Friday, 24th February, 2006



- Slippery Jacks in August?

Wednesday, 17th August, 2005



- Lentilles du Puy

Friday, 5th August, 2005



- A Delightful Warm Vegetable Salad

Wednesday, 20th April 2005



- A Tasty Fish Soup

Friday, 28th January, 2005



- The French Pizza from Provence - Pissaladiere

Friday, 28th January, 2005



- Another Broad Bean Option

Wednesday, 3rd November, 2004



- A Good Recipe for Broad Beans

Saturday, 30th October, 2004



- The Collection and Smoking of Mussels

Sunday, 18th October, 2004



- Cooking East Coast Whiting

Thursday, 14th October, 2004



- A Great Yabby Recipe

Saturday, 17th October, 2004



- The Perfect Fish Batter

Friday, 8th October, 2004



- Flathead Sushi

Wednesday, 15th September, 2004



- A Classic Carp Recipe

Wednesday, 4th August, 2004


Lentilles du Puy
Friday, 5th August, 2005 - Simon Grant

Over here in Glug’s Victorian bureau our culinary interest has in recent times turned to lentils. I will point out that the associated health benefits while appreciated have nothing to do with this interest. The earthy flavour and firm texture enables this versatile pulse to marry with a diverse range of our gamier winter interests such as duck, squab and pork. By the way when it comes to Pork it pays to seek out some of the rare breeds which are becoming more freely available, particularly the so called ‘black pork’ from England (there are a number of these) which is being bred by some enthusiasts around the country.

The French Puy lentils are regarded as green lentils although the colour often tends to be more slate grey. They are renowned for holding their shape and texture with extended cooking while other varieties can turn mushy. These green lentils are now grown quite extensively in Australia with Mount Zero between Horsham and the Grampians being the most widely known. In Italy a very similar (possibly the same) variety is grown known as Castellucio lentils and traditionally slow cooked in Umbria with salted pork, sausages or other cured meats.

Paired with Duck or any of the stronger flavoured birds these lentils are ideal. Braised with onion, garlic and white wine they form a terrific base to build some more complex flavours. As always good stock comes in handy and to that you can add some reconstituted Porcini mushrooms and its ‘stock’. Braise for around 30 minutes until flavours deepen and there is some give in the lentils. Add some cooked baby beetroot for sweetness, sherry vinegar for a sharp note and some goats cheese crumbled at the end giving another textural element. As the goats cheese starts to soften serve the braise, place a crisp still pink duck breast on top of that with some deglazed pan juices poured over and call that a $35 flash restaurant main course for under $10.

If you replace the white wine with red then simply add some browned Italian Pork sausages (any good quality coarsely textured pork sausages). Forget the beetroot etc, cook for 30 minutes or so and serve with mashed potato and bitter greens of some kind. Try radicchio added to the dish for the last 15 minutes or separately braise some halved witlof in butter, a splash of white wine and chicken stock and season well. Cover and cook for around 15 minutes. In Elizabeth David’s ‘French Provincial Cooking’ she cooks them in butter for a minute then adds salt covers, turns down the heat and cooks for 10 minutes adding some lemon juice before serving. Very simple and very good.



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