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Excellent Vintage for this Ripe Sappy Style













Our specialty is seafood where we take a pared down approach. Less is better. And over the last decade we have been working out how to best cook freshly gathered funghi. Then there are recipes which we have used successfully over many years. These are adaptations of recipes we have taken from books and we will give you our source. Mostly these will lead back to another book.

Our Recipes

The Use of Decanters to Create Theatre at a Xmas Lunch
Friday, 6th October, 2017 - David Farmer

You can find great food in humble restaurants and spotting these places before the crowd arrives is most satisfying. In general though the great restaurants of the world, though I only know France and Australia well, are not modest in appearance. It seems success at the highest level of cooking is associated with creating a similar level of ambience, even luxury, as after-all the clientele are wealthy. more...

All About Chinese Tea, Part 2
The Famous and Special Teas of China

Wednesday, 2nd March, 2011 - David Farmer

I was fortunate to spend time in China in the late 1970's and early 1980's which came about from one of the poorly thought out business ideas of my brother and I to import tea from China. What follows comes from notes I took during an extended stay in June, 1980. I believe this information will prove quite useful to those who love tea and its many types. more...

All About Chinese Tea, Part 1
Thursday, 16th July, 2009 - David Farmer

I was fortunate to spend time in China in the late 1970's and early 1980's which came about from one of the poorly thought out business ideas of my brother and I to import tea from China. What follows comes from notes I took during an extended stay in June, 1980. I believe this information will prove quite useful to those who love tea and its many types. more...

A Fish Sauce and Tony Bilson's Whiting Quenelles
Sunday, 28th June, 2009 - David Farmer

Elizabeth David

Catching and eating fish is the ultimate life's pleasure. I seldom use a sauce as the approach to fish is cook them when fresh and keep it simple. With that said for a number of years I have experimented with a recipe of the great Elizabeth David which was published in The Complete Imbiber, No. 6. (Vista Books, London, 1963). more...


- Rabbit Pie with Pine Mushrooms

Friday, 5th June, 2009



- Mark Lloyd of Coriole Talks About Olives and Oil

Friday, 28th March, 2008



- Tales about Oysters, Opening and Eating

Thursday, 6th December, 2007



- Yeast Leavened Pancakes

Thursday, 22nd February, 2007



- Peasant Mushroom Soup

Friday, May 26th, 2006



- Fish, Eggs and Steaming Bream

Wednesday, March 22nd, 2006



- Cheong Liew's Steamed Eggplant with Tomato Chilli Sauce

Tuesday, 28th February, 2006



- Time for Saucing

Friday, 24th February, 2006



- Slippery Jacks in August?

Wednesday, 17th August, 2005



- Lentilles du Puy

Friday, 5th August, 2005



- A Delightful Warm Vegetable Salad

Wednesday, 20th April 2005



- A Tasty Fish Soup

Friday, 28th January, 2005



- The French Pizza from Provence - Pissaladiere

Friday, 28th January, 2005



- Another Broad Bean Option

Wednesday, 3rd November, 2004



- A Good Recipe for Broad Beans

Saturday, 30th October, 2004



- The Collection and Smoking of Mussels

Sunday, 18th October, 2004



- Cooking East Coast Whiting

Thursday, 14th October, 2004



- A Great Yabby Recipe

Saturday, 17th October, 2004



- The Perfect Fish Batter

Friday, 8th October, 2004



- Flathead Sushi

Wednesday, 15th September, 2004



- A Classic Carp Recipe

Wednesday, 4th August, 2004


Cheong Liew's Steamed Eggplant with Tomato Chilli Sauce
Tuesday, 28th February, 2006 - Emily Dixon


There are of course hundreds of recipes from all over the globe that are specific for the eggplant including this great entree recipe that I love to do for dinner parties. It is uncomplicated, elegant and very easy.

My only addition to Cheong's comments is that you need to be mindful of how much you fry the eggplant - too much and the dish will shrivel in the steamer. It should be just lightly fried to a golden brown colour - all you are doing is creating the caramelisation reaction, whilst soaking up some of the oil which imparts a slight nutty flavour that pairs extremely well with the sesame oil in the accompanying sauce - the steamer does the cooking.

Taken from 'My Food' by Cheong Liew


STEAMED EGGPLANT

2 eggplants
salt
peanut oil
2 cloves of garlic, chopped

TOMATO CHILLI SAUCE

1 tablespoon light soy sauce
1 tablespoon oyster sauce
3 tablespoons fresh tomato puree
1 tablespoon sugar
1/2 tablespoon sesame oil
1 teaspoon chilli oil

Cut eggplants lengthwise into 8 pieces. Lightly salt to remove bitterness; leave to stand for 10 minutes until beads of water appear on the surface, then dry with kitchen paper.

In a wok, heat up enough oil to shallow-fry. Add the garlic cloves and fry until golden brown. Remove garlic and set aside. Brown each piece of eggplant in the oil then remove and drain the excess oil by placing on absorbent kitchen paper. Put the eggplant on a plate and put the browned garlic on top. Steam eggplant for 10 minutes in a Chinese steamer or a large covered plate over boiling water (don't forget to drain water off the plate).

Mix ingredients together to make the sauce.

Pour the sauce over the hot eggplant. Garnish with spring onion and sprinkle with white pepper. Serve at once.

Serves 4



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